The Best Donation I could ever make – ignored!

I was called recently on the phone by Kræftens Bekæmpelse ,  the Danish Cancer Society. Was I aware that 48 men are diagnosed with cancer in Denmark every day? What did the want me to do? Pledge money!

I asked if the caller was an outsourced fundraiser or worked for KB. She did work there, so I told her that the best donation I could make was to put them in touch with Misha Sakharoff, whom I know as the “Spontaneous Remission Consultant”. I said that this had the potential to save lives and money. She agreed and said that BK acknowledged that life-style was a probable cause of cancer.

I wrote to Micha to check if anyone from Kræftens Bekæmpelse had called; No, was the answer. They had probably thought I was a nutter. On the other hand, it would put a nasty spoke in their business model. And I am sure they have a business model, despite all the good they do.

In 2011, 48% of the income went on research, 26% on supporting patients, 19% on information and 7% on administration, the last translating to 36.44 million Danish Kroner. (About £3.5 m or €5 m). Incidentally, I called KB to find out what proportion of research went to prevention. They didn’t respond.

I asked someone in the health industry why it would not be of interest for KB to make enquiries. The answer was that there would be no way of proving Micha’s methods (except, of course, cancer patients survive!). So this is the way the health industry works: No proof, no adoption of treatment.

I wonder if they are all atheists? Because they happily go to their respective churches without any proof of anything behind the religion they follow.

“There are none so blind that will not see”

 

 

 

 

The Road to a Low-Carb Diet

I digress. I have said that the breathing was key, but in learning of the Ketogenic diet I expressed a concern that I had “high” cholesterol. Lots of material came my way and the message very clear that there is no such thing as “high” cholesterol. So I could go on a Ketogenic diet if I desired. Why would I want to do that? It’s complicated – but if you want a medical paper as a refernce as to why it is beneficial and how it contradicts previous thinking, see “Metabolic Effects of the Very-Low-Carbohydrate Diets: Misunderstood “Villains” of Human Metabolism“. This type of paper becomes a recurring theme, and opened my eyes to the fact that the medical profession may be parrotting what they learnt years ago instead of looking at new research OR the evidence is detrimental to the drug producers’ sales figures. Probably a combination of the two.

I will get back to the Ketogenic diet thing later.

Anyway,  after reading The Physicians Guide to the Cholesterol Myth (link to the PDF download) , I started to get upset, because it contradicted something I had been told by doctors. I realised that I had possibly been taken in by the medical industry.

Have you ever been tested for cholesterol in a chemist’s? A couple of years ago, I was buying something in the chemist’s, when I was asked if I wanted a free cholesterol test. “OK”, I said. A prick on the thumb and then: “Oh!, your cholesterol is terribly high – I advise that you go to see your GP”. It was 7.1. I duly went along to the doctor’s after having a full blood test at a lab.

It was 6.2, but apparently I had too much LDL and too little HDL, plus my Triglycerides were high. I was offered statins, a treatment that reduces cholesterol. Luckily, I had heard about this drug and its side effects. Such as lowering testosterone. You don’t really need that at 60! Well, my odds were 20:1 of having a heart attack in the next 20 years. I am not a big betting man, but I thought those odds were acceptable. If I had a horse come in at  20:1 I would be a very happy and lucky man.

I was advised not to eat fats, especially eggs, butter and other dairy products.

If you take the time to read the report and follow the references to medical research, you would learn that this advice is crap! Now, I had been advised since the age of thirty or so that I would get gall stones unless I cut down on eating fats and also, eating fats was a factor in getting reflux and an acid stomach. Therefore, I have always cut the fat off the steak, had no butter on bread and eaten no eggs.

But now I was going to change that. In mid June 2015, I started eating fats, mainly by putting olive and flax oil on salads, fish, meat and eggs. However, I stopped eating bread, potatoes, pasta and rice. That is, all starchy or grain-based carbohydrates. I still ate porridge oats for breakfast but in smaller amounts. I also vowed to avoid “free” sugar if at all possible. Up until the end of July 2015 (about 6 weeks) , this is what has transpired:

  • I have lost 6 kilos (about a stone) (87.8 kg. down to 81.8 kg.)
  • I have not had to have one single Pantoprazole or other indigestion tablet, because I have not had indigestion! (for the first time as an adult)
  • I have slept better (probably because of improved breathing)
  • I no longer suffer from athlete’s foot
  • I am never hungry – I do not feel the need to eat between meals

So what is going on? Is it just me or is this the same for everybody?

I might add that my Body Mass Index (BMI) was 27.4, which put me in the “overweight” class. It is now 25.5, which is slightly overweight. My Body Fat Index (BFI) has fallen correspondingly, to about 21. This is still over what is recommened (20), so I have 2 kilos to go.

This experience has caused me to put a question mark against the medical profession’s wisdom and the medical/drug/food industry’s motives. If eating a fatty diet has no connection with high cholesterol and avoiding carbs leads to weight loss, then why do we get medicated with statins and insulin to deal with heart problems and diabetes type 2?

We will go deeper into this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What did Raimundas’s recovery mean to me?

I described the sequence of events that led to Raimundas’s “spontaneous remission” on the first page. 

As with anyone, I was very happy to hear this and then sceptical. How could he be cured when the best and most expensive treatment the Danish health system could throw at it fail? How was it done? What was I missing?

Vanessa asked me to do a simple test: She wanted to test my “CP”. I had to breathe in, breathe out, then see how long it took before I was forced to take another inhalation; 17 seconds. “Not bad”, she said ,”a cancer patient can do about 5 seconds” I was relieved – I must be OK, right? Like most people I know, I have a lurking fear of the Big C.  I know so many people who have been cut short in their prime because of it. And to cap that, a recent BBC article said that it is expected that half the UK population will get cancer. Hey, I am a Brit, so it is statistically even money!

Vanessa said that this CP is the test for how much carbon dioxide is in your bloodstream. Carbon Dioxide in my bloodstream? Surely, I don’t want that? I want oxygen – not carbon dioxide! (or so I thought). Well, yes, I do want oxygen, but what I didn’t know that I need carbon dioxide to be able to release the oxygen from the oxygen-rich blood into my cells. Why? Because essentially, cancer cannot survive in an oxygenated cell. I will explain that later.

So what had Raimundas done? He had, through careful monitoring of a training course, increased his CP (short for “control pause”) from the cancer-sufferer’s 5 seconds to 60 seconds. And according to Micha, cancer is unlikely to survive in someone with a CP of over 40 seconds.

And what does the training do? It is designed to reprogramme your medula oblangata (the control centre for the body’s automatic functions) to accept more carbon dioxide in your body. Up to 7% actually. Pretty fantastic considering the atmospheric concentration is  0.4%.

I have to say at this point that Raimundas also did other things, such as centering, calorific restriction and ketogenic diet. All this is explained on Micha’s web site.

Anyway, I wanted to find out more. Reading some of the theory behind this led me to adopt some of the practices, although not all. I figured that I was in pretty good shape, but I knew there was room for improvement.