Are you saving up for a rainy (Alzheimer’s) Day?

Most of us over 40 are thinking about that time when we can retire from full-time employment. We dream of living under the motto of ‘cum dignitate otium’, translated as ‘leisure with dignity’. We save up by way of contributing to a pension scheme, with the view to having a comfortable living, free from debt, where we can do things that are on our ‘bucket list’, such as that world cruise, visiting the Grand Canyon or just enjoying the grandchildren.

 

We make an assumption that we and our partner will be in good health for at least the first part of the retirement. We also hope that we can live for many years to come with our ‘full five’. When we contemplate this, we often think of dementia and then we immediately put the thought away. Why? Because we do not want to think about getting an illness which is fatal and there is no known conventional cure for.

 

When you get to 60+, you may become aware of idiosyncrasies which are referred to sometimes as ‘senior moments’, either in yourself or your partner. We immediately go into denial and brush it off as just a temporary lack of concentration. We do not want to think of it being any worse than that – and it may well be exactly that. However, there is a reluctance to go to the doctor and ‘have it checked out’, just in case. Other illnesses can be dealt with. it seems, albeit that they cannot be cured, but the symptoms can be held down by medication. But dementia, especially Alzheimer’s disease, which accounts for about two-thirds of dementia cases, is something we do not want to be diagnosed with.

 

But what happens if we or a loved one is? Then the decline will come to a certain death. Could be 2 years, could be 10. The worst thing is the effect it has on the family and possibly your wealth.

 

Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) requires that care is available and very often the caregiver is a family member. This family member has to deal with this former stalwart of the family losing mental abilities and towards the end, being likened to an infant. Devastating! Coupled with the frustration and anger or the total passivity of the victim.

 

The care required at later stages in a home costs money and in some countries, there is no financial support available at all, or in some countries it is capped. This can wipe out the pensions savings of a victim and partner, and when the victim passes away, the partner is left without a penny. Absolutely tragic!

 

But I have some good news.

 

If AD is diagnosed early enough, when it is still at a stage of mild cognitive decline, then the progress can be stopped and reversed. Without medication. Due to the research from Dr. Dale Bredesen in the US, learn that AD is not a pathological disease as such, more of a syndrome and the plaque and protein tangles are simply the brain doing its job trying to protect neurons, but because of signalling caused by a multitude of factors, goes amok and starts killing neurons. That is a simplified explanation, to say the least. However, by changing aspects of lifestyle which brought on the condition, it is possible to undo the damage and return the individual to a normal life. This process has been well documented and has a 90% success rate.

 

With all respect to Dr. Bredesen, a vital factor is not taken into consideration and this factor, namely correct respiration, combined with other factors , combined with others allows the return to normality, or allostasis, without any drugs –  just an intensive lifestyle change which is not a cure that can be stopped after a while, but a way of life that maintains the allostasis. A great advantage is that other syndromes that have their roots in metabolic dysfunctions are also reversed to the great benefit of the individual. No New Age, no magic, no medicine – just common sense engineering.

 

 

Here is a diagram where NPMA – Non Pharmacological Metabolic Approach is mentioned, which is based on the Sakharoff Protocol. As you can see in this diagram, there is a tipping point – a point of no return. This is where it is impossible to implement the daily effort needed to change lifestyle through NPMA Before that, indeed up to 20 years, there is a period of plaque accumulation and where a degree of cognitive impairment is displayed and it is at this stage where action must be taken. Therefore, a cognoscopy’ needs to be carried out. Dr. Bredesen recommends that all adults over 45 should take a cognoscopy on a regular basis, just like screening with mammography, colonoscopy or smear tests. Especially if one is genetically at risk by having the Apoe4 gene from one or both parents.

 

The problem is that the whole subject of dementia is a taboo and that has to change. No one wants to be diagnosed with any form of dementia, because conventional medicine has nothing to offer. Pfizer, the American pharmaceutical giant, recently gave up research into AD and Parkinson drugs. In the USA, insurance companies withdraw support for long-term care if a patient is diagnosed with memory problems.

 

If you yourself have any suspicion of cognitive impairment (CI) or you have a spouse or a parent/grandparent who you suspect of having CI, get tested. Then you can go here for more information on a course of action – whether you or a relation will help you, or a trained professional will guide you back to normality. This makes a lot of economic sense, as the costs will be a fraction of the potential total costs of care.

 

So, carry on saving for that world cruise and a long, healthy life – but don’t forget the cognoscopy!

No one is immune from dementia – not even royal families

A photo of Prince Henrik in 2010. Holger Motzkau 2010, Wikipedia/Wikimedia Commons (cc-by-sa-3.0) 

 

The Danish TV news this evening is focusing on the fact that Prince Henrik, who is the husband of the Danish Queen Margrethe, has been diagnosed with dementia, namely Alzheimer’s disease. It is, of course, terrible news. He is 83 years old. I do not think that the majority of Danes are entirely surprised by this news because he has been saying some bizarre things publicly in recent months.

Dementia is widespread

The TV news has decided to focus on Alzheimer’s: in Denmark, we have a national centre for knowledge about dementia and, of course, the Alzheimer’s Association. In interviews with leading persons from these organisations, we learn that between 75,000 and 100,000 people in Denmark have dementia, of which 50 to 65,000 have Alzheimer’s disease. Neither of the interviewees indicated that anything could be done to cure Prince Henrik of his ailment.

They also interviewed relations of those who have had Alzheimer’s disease and these people, of course, expressed sympathy with the Royal Family in the struggle they will have in the future months, maybe years, with a loved one who is declining in cognitive ability.

People are rightly scared of being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s

This focus on Alzheimer’s disease has the effect of making Danes very aware of it. The estimate is that there are about 8500 new cases every year. Just like AIDS in the 80s, people are terrified of this disease because there are no treatments to reverse the symptoms of this terrible disease. The question is, is this true? I will come back to that later.

My wife is a district nurse. She visits the homes of those with dementia every day and says that in a way a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s seems to be worse than a diagnosis of cancer because it is possible to treat cancer on early detection. However, it seems that Alzheimer’s cannot. With Alzheimers, the personality of the person you knew gradually disappears.

This fear of Alzheimer’s disease, and indeed other forms of dementia, means that many people seem to be reluctant to follow up on their suspicions at an early stage. The victims and the relations are simply in denial. But what if it was possible to reverse Alzheimer’s disease if diagnosed early enough?

There is hope, however

In the United States, a doctor by the name of Dale Bredesen has had outstanding results in treating Alzheimer’s disease because he views Alzheimer’s disease as a metabolic disease meaning that if the multifactorial causes are addressed early enough, nutrition for example, then the condition can be reversed.

Now what I’m about to say may sound far-fetched to the layman, but the metabolic nature of Alzheimer’s disease puts it in the same category as type II diabetes and various autoimmune diseases. A course of action which addresses energy acquisition and distribution will have the effect of reversing Alzheimer’s disease as long as it is caught at an early stage when the sufferer is still in a situation to adopt and adapt to certain lifestyle changes.

It is probably not politically correct to say that we know the answer at a time when expert health professionals stand in front of TV cameras implying that there is nothing to do to help Prince Henrik.

Early diagnosis is vital if something should be done to reverse AD

My point is that people who suspect they have signs of cognitive decline and their relations should come forward at an early stage to get a diagnosis and start working on changing lifestyle to reverse the condition. Remember that the pharmaceutical industry has spent billions on trying to find a cure. They probably never will because there are too many factors involved. All they can do is to slow it down.

For all four types of dementia medicine recommended by the Danish National Board of Health, the disease is not stopped, but the development of the symptoms are delayed a little. It has thus become clear that medicinal treatment can not stand alone. In recent years, a significant part of the research on dementia and the recently adopted National Action Plan in Denmark has been about giving patients more physical activity, healthier lifestyles and cognitive stimuli.

If I had to choose for myself or one in my family, the choice would not be difficult.

 

Does Alzheimer’s scare you?

PET Scans. source: creative commons

I suppose that question depends on how old you are, or if you have people in your family who have died of Alzheimer’s. If you’re one of those, I don’t have to tell you how dreadful this disease is. To see a loved one lose their identity and become an empty shell, finally, to die from the lack of ability to eat or breathe.

 Alzheimer’s Epidemic?

It seems that Alzheimer’s disease is affecting more and more people. According to figures, there are over 530,000 people are present in the UK suffering from Alzheimer’s disease out of 862,000 suffering dementia. There are massive implications for society and the health service. Some £36,000 is used for every patient on average because full-time care is required. There adds up to some £30 billion a year, for which the NHS bears most of the burden.

The estimates are that the number of people with Alzheimer’s will triple in the next 30 years . You could say that that is a consequence of people living longer, which to a degree is true, and you could also say it is because the medicine currently available slows down the progress of the disease. Slowing down the disease, is in my opinion, a double-edged sword.

Early Onset

40,000 people under the age of 65 have dementia . There are currently nearly 36 million people with dementia in the world, but as many as 28 million of those living with dementia worldwide do not have a diagnosis .

The outlook in the United States is even bleaker: according to the Alzheimer’s Society , AD is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States. More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s at present, and by 2050, this number could rise as high as 16 million. In 2017, Alzheimer’s and other dementia will cost the United States, $259 billion. By 2050. These costs could rise as high as $1.1 trillion. Every 66 seconds someone in the United States develops the disease. It kills more than breast cancer and prostate cancer combined.

Alzheimers disease beta-amyloid plaque formation. source: Creative Commons

Drugs cannot cure Alzheimers – only slow down its progress

If you look at the material on Alzheimer’s on the Internet, you will find that there is a lot of research being done, but at present the does not appear to be a cure. At least, I cure by drug-related treatment. Unfortunately, it seems that money for research is channelled into discovering drugs or concentrating on genetic causes.

Although there are is no doubt that some of the cleverest brains in the world are facing the challenges of finding new treatments and drugs, it may well be that they are “barking up the wrong tree.”.

If one takes a look at the research going on that is not funded by drug companies or has a genetic causation slant, then you will find that some promising discoveries are being made. The primary thrust is that Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases are possibly caused by metabolic dysfunction, in turn, caused by chronic stress, and although genetic factors are critical, it is the way that genes are expressed. Given the chronic stress applied which leads to the disease.

Reverse Alzheimer’s? Are you serious?

This research has not gone unnoticed by Misha Sakharoff, who has developed a protocol which provides a drug-free path for the prevention and reversal of lifestyle diseases. He believes that by applying this protocol, early diagnosed Alzheimer’s can be stopped and even reversed.

You probably will choose not to believe the last sentence, because it is beyond most people’s belief system. Reverse Alzheimer’s? A crazy? When has brain tissue been destroyed?

Yes, it does sound a little far-fetched but happens to be based on sound engineering principles, which takes note of the very latest medical research.

You’re right to be scared about Alzheimer’s disease. It is a terrible thing. Some doctors say that everybody over the age of 45 should undergo a test, maybe have a brain scan, to see if they are in the early stages of dementia. But what is the point of having those tests, if there is no cure? I suppose many people would do that and then start looking at lifestyle changes to try and avoid developing the disease later, or merely pray and hope that some wonder drug is invented to cure all the 36 known metabolic pathways that need to be fixed. Even the drug companies admit that this is not feasible.

8-week course to learn about the latest research

Misha is offering an eight-week video course for all comers, to explain the what’s and the why of Alzheimer’s and how is protocol can stop it. Beyond this course, if early-diagnosed sufferers wish to take up the fight, there is the possibility of joining a paid course, in which the progress will be monitored by medical doctors.

Is this wishful thinking bullshit? I don’t think so. I’ve seen results of applying this protocol, and I have adopted the protocol to the ultimate benefit fit of my health. An American doctor has achieved a success rate of 9/10 patients returning to normal brain function. Even if this course leads to just 10% being cured, it is better than what we have right now.

It is possible to sign up for this course by visiting this page. If you know anybody who has early stage Alzheimer’s, has parents who have died from Alzheimer’s, or you simply want to address your fear and change your lifestyle to minimise the risk, I suggest you sign up. It is free.

Anti-inflammatory Porridge

kale smoothie
The original smoothie with kale

It started as a smoothie. I have often made a smoothie that includes some healthy nutrients. At the same time, I try to keep within the bounds of a low-carb diet

One of the factors in integrative health is the immune system.  Along with nourishment, breathing, mental training, and movement. These 5 vectors are all interlinked. Working with these areas and “connecting the dots”  is the key to good health.

What is our immune system? The system in our body that fights disease and foreign bodies. It consists of the lymphatic system. Part of the function of this system is to transport white blood cells to and from the lymph nodes. In this way, it helps rid the body of toxins, waste and other unwanted materials.

What is inflammation? It is the body’s response to harmful stimuli from foreign organisms. This is a biological reaction to the work of the white blood cells, sent by the lymphatic system.

Is inflammation bad? Not at all, when it is acute. It tells you to stop injuring yourself further – by movement, for example, in a joint injury. In other words, acute inflammation is a good thing. The body repairs itself this way.

So when is it bad? When in becomes chronic, or systemic. Many factors cause systemic inflammation. Systemic inflammation can lead to major health problems, such as cardiovascular disease. We do not want systemic inflammation. We want to avoid it.

What has food got to do with it? Certain kinds of food cause systemic inflammation. Not in everyone. Some people have a genetic predisposal to react to some foods. For example, foods from the nightshade family – potatoes, aubergines, tomatoes and sweet peppers. Hardly surprising when deadly nightshade (belladonna) is a poison. At a cellular level, the toxins present act as an irritant, thus causing inflammation.

Luckily, there are many foods that are anti-inflammatory. They reduce inflammation.

I recently saw a list of 24 foods that are anti-inflammatory. There are more than this number.  I noticed that several of them were in my smoothie. So I tried to expand my smoothie to include more. Only my smoothie became a porridge. On account of chia seeds, I suspect.

I will explain my porridge.

The base is buttermilk. Nothing too anti-inflammatory here. 250 ml. Organic. To this, I add a little fruit. Not too much so as not to kick me out of ketosis. As I have this for breakfast, or “break fast”, I drink a bullet-proof coffee before. I add a small piece banana, just 20g. A good source of potassium and soluble fibre – good for the gut. You can substitute this with cauliflower for less sugar. Red seedless grapes. 20g.  They contain anthocyanins and resveratrol.

Blueberries. 30g. Blueberries are sometimes called a superfood because of the antioxidants and vitamins. Pomegranates, 30g. Contain phytochemicals

So that was the fruits. Now the seeds. I mix seeds together, adding 40g in total to the porridge. Chia seeds (16g) are the reason it becomes a porridge. They undergo a dramatic expansion when put in liquids. Lots of omega-3 fats. Not as bioavailable as those from oily fish, but still. Important in reducing the inflammation related to heart disease. Flax seeds (8g) for similar benefits to chia. Hemp seeds (8g), anti-inflammatory due to gamma linolenic acid. Sesame seeds (8g) contains sesamol. Also, these seeds contain lots of minerals.

seed mix
Seed mix – chia, flax, sesame and hemp

 

Then we add the spices. Ginger (10g) is the one you are most familiar with. Contains gingerols. powerful stuff. Turmeric is also touted as a superfood. The active ingredient here is curcumin. Be careful handling this (as a root). It stains everything! Do not get it on white plastic appliances! I also add a fair amount of cumin, cayenne pepper, and cinnamon. Almost like a curry!

Sometimes I will cut a sprig of kale from the garden.  Kale is available the whole winter. 

That is 11 of the list of 24. I don’t think I want to add fish or olive oil! I take 5ml of cod liver oil on the side to get DHA and EPA plus vitamin D. Garlic would be useful. It tends to screw your social life.

All this can be a little bitter, so I add some vanilla flavoured stevia drops.

Then I use the hand blender and after I have liquefied everything, I leave it for a while. This lets the chia seeds bloat.

Yes, there are other things I could add. You can vary the recipe a bit. Apple peel and cherries might be a tasty addition.

What does it do? For me, it eliminates joint pain. I used to have to wake up every hour to roll over at night. This was due to pain in my back and my hips. I do not do this anymore. I get a good night’s sleep.

I know that by eating or drinking this concoction, I am reducing inflammation. I am including other factors that reduce chronic inflammation. I am following the integrative health protocol. This is the key to good health. A life without pain. This is important when you are over 60. No – this is vital when you are over 60. It is the difference between living and existing.