Are you saving up for a rainy (Alzheimer’s) Day?

Most of us over 40 are thinking about that time when we can retire from full-time employment. We dream of living under the motto of ‘cum dignitate otium’, translated as ‘leisure with dignity’. We save up by way of contributing to a pension scheme, with the view to having a comfortable living, free from debt, where we can do things that are on our ‘bucket list’, such as that world cruise, visiting the Grand Canyon or just enjoying the grandchildren.

 

We make an assumption that we and our partner will be in good health for at least the first part of the retirement. We also hope that we can live for many years to come with our ‘full five’. When we contemplate this, we often think of dementia and then we immediately put the thought away. Why? Because we do not want to think about getting an illness which is fatal and there is no known conventional cure for.

 

When you get to 60+, you may become aware of idiosyncrasies which are referred to sometimes as ‘senior moments’, either in yourself or your partner. We immediately go into denial and brush it off as just a temporary lack of concentration. We do not want to think of it being any worse than that – and it may well be exactly that. However, there is a reluctance to go to the doctor and ‘have it checked out’, just in case. Other illnesses can be dealt with. it seems, albeit that they cannot be cured, but the symptoms can be held down by medication. But dementia, especially Alzheimer’s disease, which accounts for about two-thirds of dementia cases, is something we do not want to be diagnosed with.

 

But what happens if we or a loved one is? Then the decline will come to a certain death. Could be 2 years, could be 10. The worst thing is the effect it has on the family and possibly your wealth.

 

Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) requires that care is available and very often the caregiver is a family member. This family member has to deal with this former stalwart of the family losing mental abilities and towards the end, being likened to an infant. Devastating! Coupled with the frustration and anger or the total passivity of the victim.

 

The care required at later stages in a home costs money and in some countries, there is no financial support available at all, or in some countries it is capped. This can wipe out the pensions savings of a victim and partner, and when the victim passes away, the partner is left without a penny. Absolutely tragic!

 

But I have some good news.

 

If AD is diagnosed early enough, when it is still at a stage of mild cognitive decline, then the progress can be stopped and reversed. Without medication. Due to the research from Dr. Dale Bredesen in the US, learn that AD is not a pathological disease as such, more of a syndrome and the plaque and protein tangles are simply the brain doing its job trying to protect neurons, but because of signalling caused by a multitude of factors, goes amok and starts killing neurons. That is a simplified explanation, to say the least. However, by changing aspects of lifestyle which brought on the condition, it is possible to undo the damage and return the individual to a normal life. This process has been well documented and has a 90% success rate.

 

With all respect to Dr. Bredesen, a vital factor is not taken into consideration and this factor, namely correct respiration, combined with other factors , combined with others allows the return to normality, or allostasis, without any drugs –  just an intensive lifestyle change which is not a cure that can be stopped after a while, but a way of life that maintains the allostasis. A great advantage is that other syndromes that have their roots in metabolic dysfunctions are also reversed to the great benefit of the individual. No New Age, no magic, no medicine – just common sense engineering.

 

 

Here is a diagram where NPMA – Non Pharmacological Metabolic Approach is mentioned, which is based on the Sakharoff Protocol. As you can see in this diagram, there is a tipping point – a point of no return. This is where it is impossible to implement the daily effort needed to change lifestyle through NPMA Before that, indeed up to 20 years, there is a period of plaque accumulation and where a degree of cognitive impairment is displayed and it is at this stage where action must be taken. Therefore, a cognoscopy’ needs to be carried out. Dr. Bredesen recommends that all adults over 45 should take a cognoscopy on a regular basis, just like screening with mammography, colonoscopy or smear tests. Especially if one is genetically at risk by having the Apoe4 gene from one or both parents.

 

The problem is that the whole subject of dementia is a taboo and that has to change. No one wants to be diagnosed with any form of dementia, because conventional medicine has nothing to offer. Pfizer, the American pharmaceutical giant, recently gave up research into AD and Parkinson drugs. In the USA, insurance companies withdraw support for long-term care if a patient is diagnosed with memory problems.

 

If you yourself have any suspicion of cognitive impairment (CI) or you have a spouse or a parent/grandparent who you suspect of having CI, get tested. Then you can go here for more information on a course of action – whether you or a relation will help you, or a trained professional will guide you back to normality. This makes a lot of economic sense, as the costs will be a fraction of the potential total costs of care.

 

So, carry on saving for that world cruise and a long, healthy life – but don’t forget the cognoscopy!

Does Alzheimer’s scare you?

PET Scans. source: creative commons

I suppose that question depends on how old you are, or if you have people in your family who have died of Alzheimer’s. If you’re one of those, I don’t have to tell you how dreadful this disease is. To see a loved one lose their identity and become an empty shell, finally, to die from the lack of ability to eat or breathe.

 Alzheimer’s Epidemic?

It seems that Alzheimer’s disease is affecting more and more people. According to figures, there are over 530,000 people are present in the UK suffering from Alzheimer’s disease out of 862,000 suffering dementia. There are massive implications for society and the health service. Some £36,000 is used for every patient on average because full-time care is required. There adds up to some £30 billion a year, for which the NHS bears most of the burden.

The estimates are that the number of people with Alzheimer’s will triple in the next 30 years . You could say that that is a consequence of people living longer, which to a degree is true, and you could also say it is because the medicine currently available slows down the progress of the disease. Slowing down the disease, is in my opinion, a double-edged sword.

Early Onset

40,000 people under the age of 65 have dementia . There are currently nearly 36 million people with dementia in the world, but as many as 28 million of those living with dementia worldwide do not have a diagnosis .

The outlook in the United States is even bleaker: according to the Alzheimer’s Society , AD is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States. More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s at present, and by 2050, this number could rise as high as 16 million. In 2017, Alzheimer’s and other dementia will cost the United States, $259 billion. By 2050. These costs could rise as high as $1.1 trillion. Every 66 seconds someone in the United States develops the disease. It kills more than breast cancer and prostate cancer combined.

Alzheimers disease beta-amyloid plaque formation. source: Creative Commons

Drugs cannot cure Alzheimers – only slow down its progress

If you look at the material on Alzheimer’s on the Internet, you will find that there is a lot of research being done, but at present the does not appear to be a cure. At least, I cure by drug-related treatment. Unfortunately, it seems that money for research is channelled into discovering drugs or concentrating on genetic causes.

Although there are is no doubt that some of the cleverest brains in the world are facing the challenges of finding new treatments and drugs, it may well be that they are “barking up the wrong tree.”.

If one takes a look at the research going on that is not funded by drug companies or has a genetic causation slant, then you will find that some promising discoveries are being made. The primary thrust is that Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases are possibly caused by metabolic dysfunction, in turn, caused by chronic stress, and although genetic factors are critical, it is the way that genes are expressed. Given the chronic stress applied which leads to the disease.

Reverse Alzheimer’s? Are you serious?

This research has not gone unnoticed by Misha Sakharoff, who has developed a protocol which provides a drug-free path for the prevention and reversal of lifestyle diseases. He believes that by applying this protocol, early diagnosed Alzheimer’s can be stopped and even reversed.

You probably will choose not to believe the last sentence, because it is beyond most people’s belief system. Reverse Alzheimer’s? A crazy? When has brain tissue been destroyed?

Yes, it does sound a little far-fetched but happens to be based on sound engineering principles, which takes note of the very latest medical research.

You’re right to be scared about Alzheimer’s disease. It is a terrible thing. Some doctors say that everybody over the age of 45 should undergo a test, maybe have a brain scan, to see if they are in the early stages of dementia. But what is the point of having those tests, if there is no cure? I suppose many people would do that and then start looking at lifestyle changes to try and avoid developing the disease later, or merely pray and hope that some wonder drug is invented to cure all the 36 known metabolic pathways that need to be fixed. Even the drug companies admit that this is not feasible.

8-week course to learn about the latest research

Misha is offering an eight-week video course for all comers, to explain the what’s and the why of Alzheimer’s and how is protocol can stop it. Beyond this course, if early-diagnosed sufferers wish to take up the fight, there is the possibility of joining a paid course, in which the progress will be monitored by medical doctors.

Is this wishful thinking bullshit? I don’t think so. I’ve seen results of applying this protocol, and I have adopted the protocol to the ultimate benefit fit of my health. An American doctor has achieved a success rate of 9/10 patients returning to normal brain function. Even if this course leads to just 10% being cured, it is better than what we have right now.

It is possible to sign up for this course by visiting this page. If you know anybody who has early stage Alzheimer’s, has parents who have died from Alzheimer’s, or you simply want to address your fear and change your lifestyle to minimise the risk, I suggest you sign up. It is free.

Club NoMed

“Hello, long time no see!” I said.

I had not seen Eddie for a long time, not since the 25th reunion. He had changed, but had not all of them? He still had his hair, but he was a lot bigger than I remember him. There was a paunch, and he seemed laboured in his movements.

“How are things with you?” I asked.

“Well, I can’t complain. All the normal problems that you can expect when you get beyond 60. But it is all under control. I’m taking medication for it. But you’re looking good!”

“Well, I do my best to keep healthy.” I said.

“You know, it was easy to recognise you because you don’t look much different than when we started at work,” he said, catching his breath a little.

“Yes”, I replied, “I’m about the same weight as a was those days. So what medication are you taking?”

Statins for Cholesterol

Eddie replied, “Well, I take statins for my cholesterol.”

“What’s wrong with your cholesterol?”

“It’s too high, so the Doc recommended that I took them to prevent me getting a heart attack”.

“What do you mean it’s too high?” I asked.

“The doctor just says that it’s too high and I have to do something about it. He told me that having high cholesterol was a cause of heart attacks, and if I took these, I would reduce the risk.”

“I am not too sure about that.” I replied, “Cholesterol is produced naturally in the body, and you need it to function normally.”

Doctor’s Advice

Eddie continued, “The Doc says that if I take the statins, and stop eating fat, especially saturated fat, like in meat, then it would further reduce the risk.”.

“Have you noticed anything since you been taking these?”

“Funny you should say that. I have begun to wonder whether I’m getting Alzheimer’s, because of my brain feels a bit foggy. I also get some muscle pains,”

I thought to myself that it was shocking how people blindly follow authority. Patients believe every word the doctors say, and doctors believe everything they read in research papers and information from the drug companies, it seems.

“So, what do you eat these days?” I asked Eddie.

Keep taking the tablets

“While cutting down on fats was a problem, because I stopped having butter and cream and eating the fat off of the meat years ago when I switched to low-fat stuff like margarine. I like eating bread although I have to be careful it doesn’t give me acid indigestion. But that’s no problem either because taken some tablets to stop the reflux.”

“I’ve also started to put on weight in the last few years, but I guess that’s natural. I mean, it’s normal to put on about a pound a year, isn’t it?” Eddie asked.

“Well, you have to watch that weight gain, in my opinion. You may be heading for type II diabetes”.

“Funny you should say that. After a year or so taking statins, I went to the doctors and he told me that I have type II diabetes. So I am taking some tablets for that as well.”

“Aren’t you fed up with taking all these pills?”

When you age, you take pills

“Well, it’s a fact of life. When you get older, you to take a lot of pills to stay alive. Everyone around here takes lots pills. If we didn’t have the pills, will be dying earlier. So it stands to reason that we should keep taking the pills”.

“I’m a member of Club No Med.”

“Club no Med.? Is that a club for older swingers?”

“No!” I laughed. “It means that I am not on any medication.”

“So you live with your illnesses?”

“As far as I know, I don’t have any illnesses.”

“What you mean you have no illnesses? You are the same age as I am, so you must have some of these things. Is it all that healthy natural living in Scandinavia that keeps you away from the doctor’s?”

“I’m not sure about Scandinavia bit. There are quite a few people on medication there, too. There are obese people as well. But I do think people are better informed about their health choices.”

You pay your taxes, you take your medicine

Eddie said, “But I mean if you have a national health service which you’ve paid the tax for, and get pills or something to sort you out, isn’t it best just to go there and get the prescription?”

“Yes, that would be the easy way out. Not having to think about it, or do something actively about your health.” Just a touch of sarcasm in my voice.

“You can’t do anything about your health, can you? I mean, it’s all in your genes, isn’t it? If sickness and death come, you can’t do much about it. Your number is up.”

” I beg to differ on that point,” said I

I had not eaten breakfast that morning, but now it was approaching lunchtime, I felt like having something to eat. So I took out a bag of coconut pieces. I offered one to Eddie.

It’s full of fat!

“No thanks,! I’m not eating that. It’s full of fat!”.

Eddie reached for his backpack and took out some food.

He said, “I get very hungry if I don’t have a snack. But I’ve got some healthy stuff here.” He produced a banana, some orange juice, and one of those muesli bars. I must admit, I raised my eyebrows.

I could not help myself from commenting, “Full of sugar, that lot.”.

“No, it’s not. It’s full of fruit and fibre. Good stuff!”.

Whatever, I thought to myself. What a disaster it was for my fellow countrymen. Such a contrast to visiting a country like Sweden. Not that everybody is super thin and healthy in Sweden, but they do seem to be able to look after themselves better. Perhaps it’s because they have inverted the food pyramid a couple of years back. Or perhaps it’s because they have low carb sections in the supermarkets.

7 million on statins in the UK

In the UK, a nation where 7 million people are prescribed statins, out of a population of 60 million, looking around me, all I saw were obese, and unhealthy-looking people. It is appalling. Have statins reduced the risk of heart attacks in the UK? There is no doubt that there are fewer deaths from heart attacks.

Survival rates are better. There are fewer transfats in the diet, and people are smoking less.

I believe that better education to encourage people to change your lifestyle would be a far more effective way of preventing heart attacks. Along with the acceptance by health professionals that cholesterol is not the cause, but an indicator, and that they accept the latest research, which shows the real reason.

Are illness and sickness really an act of God? Philosophically, I suppose the answer is yes. But I would like to believe that by taking responsibility for my health and trying to understand the physiology according to the latest research, that I could do something about it.

Join Club NoMed today – it’s free!

I am very proud not to be taking medications. I’m sure that if I went to my doctor, she would find something or another for which I should be taking medications. But my blood pressure is normal; my pulse is low, my BMI is 22.5, I am physically active, I sleep well, I think clearly, Beyond the age of 45, the best benchmark one can have is to feel as if you are 45. But my benchmark is also to be a member of Club No Med after the age of 45.