Does Alzheimer’s scare you?

PET Scans. source: creative commons

I suppose that question depends on how old you are, or if you have people in your family who have died of Alzheimer’s. If you’re one of those, I don’t have to tell you how dreadful this disease is. To see a loved one lose their identity and become an empty shell, finally, to die from the lack of ability to eat or breathe.

 Alzheimer’s Epidemic?

It seems that Alzheimer’s disease is affecting more and more people. According to figures, there are over 530,000 people are present in the UK suffering from Alzheimer’s disease out of 862,000 suffering dementia. There are massive implications for society and the health service. Some £36,000 is used for every patient on average because full-time care is required. There adds up to some £30 billion a year, for which the NHS bears most of the burden.

The estimates are that the number of people with Alzheimer’s will triple in the next 30 years . You could say that that is a consequence of people living longer, which to a degree is true, and you could also say it is because the medicine currently available slows down the progress of the disease. Slowing down the disease, is in my opinion, a double-edged sword.

Early Onset

40,000 people under the age of 65 have dementia . There are currently nearly 36 million people with dementia in the world, but as many as 28 million of those living with dementia worldwide do not have a diagnosis .

The outlook in the United States is even bleaker: according to the Alzheimer’s Society , AD is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States. More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s at present, and by 2050, this number could rise as high as 16 million. In 2017, Alzheimer’s and other dementia will cost the United States, $259 billion. By 2050. These costs could rise as high as $1.1 trillion. Every 66 seconds someone in the United States develops the disease. It kills more than breast cancer and prostate cancer combined.

Alzheimers disease beta-amyloid plaque formation. source: Creative Commons

Drugs cannot cure Alzheimers – only slow down its progress

If you look at the material on Alzheimer’s on the Internet, you will find that there is a lot of research being done, but at present the does not appear to be a cure. At least, I cure by drug-related treatment. Unfortunately, it seems that money for research is channelled into discovering drugs or concentrating on genetic causes.

Although there are is no doubt that some of the cleverest brains in the world are facing the challenges of finding new treatments and drugs, it may well be that they are “barking up the wrong tree.”.

If one takes a look at the research going on that is not funded by drug companies or has a genetic causation slant, then you will find that some promising discoveries are being made. The primary thrust is that Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases are possibly caused by metabolic dysfunction, in turn, caused by chronic stress, and although genetic factors are critical, it is the way that genes are expressed. Given the chronic stress applied which leads to the disease.

Reverse Alzheimer’s? Are you serious?

This research has not gone unnoticed by Misha Sakharoff, who has developed a protocol which provides a drug-free path for the prevention and reversal of lifestyle diseases. He believes that by applying this protocol, early diagnosed Alzheimer’s can be stopped and even reversed.

You probably will choose not to believe the last sentence, because it is beyond most people’s belief system. Reverse Alzheimer’s? A crazy? When has brain tissue been destroyed?

Yes, it does sound a little far-fetched but happens to be based on sound engineering principles, which takes note of the very latest medical research.

You’re right to be scared about Alzheimer’s disease. It is a terrible thing. Some doctors say that everybody over the age of 45 should undergo a test, maybe have a brain scan, to see if they are in the early stages of dementia. But what is the point of having those tests, if there is no cure? I suppose many people would do that and then start looking at lifestyle changes to try and avoid developing the disease later, or merely pray and hope that some wonder drug is invented to cure all the 36 known metabolic pathways that need to be fixed. Even the drug companies admit that this is not feasible.

8-week course to learn about the latest research

Misha is offering an eight-week video course for all comers, to explain the what’s and the why of Alzheimer’s and how is protocol can stop it. Beyond this course, if early-diagnosed sufferers wish to take up the fight, there is the possibility of joining a paid course, in which the progress will be monitored by medical doctors.

Is this wishful thinking bullshit? I don’t think so. I’ve seen results of applying this protocol, and I have adopted the protocol to the ultimate benefit fit of my health. An American doctor has achieved a success rate of 9/10 patients returning to normal brain function. Even if this course leads to just 10% being cured, it is better than what we have right now.

It is possible to sign up for this course by visiting this page. If you know anybody who has early stage Alzheimer’s, has parents who have died from Alzheimer’s, or you simply want to address your fear and change your lifestyle to minimise the risk, I suggest you sign up. It is free.

Club NoMed

“Hello, long time no see!” I said.

I had not seen Eddie for a long time, not since the 25th reunion. He had changed, but had not all of them? He still had his hair, but he was a lot bigger than I remember him. There was a paunch, and he seemed laboured in his movements.

“How are things with you?” I asked.

“Well, I can’t complain. All the normal problems that you can expect when you get beyond 60. But it is all under control. I’m taking medication for it. But you’re looking good!”

“Well, I do my best to keep healthy.” I said.

“You know, it was easy to recognise you because you don’t look much different than when we started at work,” he said, catching his breath a little.

“Yes”, I replied, “I’m about the same weight as a was those days. So what medication are you taking?”

Statins for Cholesterol

Eddie replied, “Well, I take statins for my cholesterol.”

“What’s wrong with your cholesterol?”

“It’s too high, so the Doc recommended that I took them to prevent me getting a heart attack”.

“What do you mean it’s too high?” I asked.

“The doctor just says that it’s too high and I have to do something about it. He told me that having high cholesterol was a cause of heart attacks, and if I took these, I would reduce the risk.”

“I am not too sure about that.” I replied, “Cholesterol is produced naturally in the body, and you need it to function normally.”

Doctor’s Advice

Eddie continued, “The Doc says that if I take the statins, and stop eating fat, especially saturated fat, like in meat, then it would further reduce the risk.”.

“Have you noticed anything since you been taking these?”

“Funny you should say that. I have begun to wonder whether I’m getting Alzheimer’s, because of my brain feels a bit foggy. I also get some muscle pains,”

I thought to myself that it was shocking how people blindly follow authority. Patients believe every word the doctors say, and doctors believe everything they read in research papers and information from the drug companies, it seems.

“So, what do you eat these days?” I asked Eddie.

Keep taking the tablets

“While cutting down on fats was a problem, because I stopped having butter and cream and eating the fat off of the meat years ago when I switched to low-fat stuff like margarine. I like eating bread although I have to be careful it doesn’t give me acid indigestion. But that’s no problem either because taken some tablets to stop the reflux.”

“I’ve also started to put on weight in the last few years, but I guess that’s natural. I mean, it’s normal to put on about a pound a year, isn’t it?” Eddie asked.

“Well, you have to watch that weight gain, in my opinion. You may be heading for type II diabetes”.

“Funny you should say that. After a year or so taking statins, I went to the doctors and he told me that I have type II diabetes. So I am taking some tablets for that as well.”

“Aren’t you fed up with taking all these pills?”

When you age, you take pills

“Well, it’s a fact of life. When you get older, you to take a lot of pills to stay alive. Everyone around here takes lots pills. If we didn’t have the pills, will be dying earlier. So it stands to reason that we should keep taking the pills”.

“I’m a member of Club No Med.”

“Club no Med.? Is that a club for older swingers?”

“No!” I laughed. “It means that I am not on any medication.”

“So you live with your illnesses?”

“As far as I know, I don’t have any illnesses.”

“What you mean you have no illnesses? You are the same age as I am, so you must have some of these things. Is it all that healthy natural living in Scandinavia that keeps you away from the doctor’s?”

“I’m not sure about Scandinavia bit. There are quite a few people on medication there, too. There are obese people as well. But I do think people are better informed about their health choices.”

You pay your taxes, you take your medicine

Eddie said, “But I mean if you have a national health service which you’ve paid the tax for, and get pills or something to sort you out, isn’t it best just to go there and get the prescription?”

“Yes, that would be the easy way out. Not having to think about it, or do something actively about your health.” Just a touch of sarcasm in my voice.

“You can’t do anything about your health, can you? I mean, it’s all in your genes, isn’t it? If sickness and death come, you can’t do much about it. Your number is up.”

” I beg to differ on that point,” said I

I had not eaten breakfast that morning, but now it was approaching lunchtime, I felt like having something to eat. So I took out a bag of coconut pieces. I offered one to Eddie.

It’s full of fat!

“No thanks,! I’m not eating that. It’s full of fat!”.

Eddie reached for his backpack and took out some food.

He said, “I get very hungry if I don’t have a snack. But I’ve got some healthy stuff here.” He produced a banana, some orange juice, and one of those muesli bars. I must admit, I raised my eyebrows.

I could not help myself from commenting, “Full of sugar, that lot.”.

“No, it’s not. It’s full of fruit and fibre. Good stuff!”.

Whatever, I thought to myself. What a disaster it was for my fellow countrymen. Such a contrast to visiting a country like Sweden. Not that everybody is super thin and healthy in Sweden, but they do seem to be able to look after themselves better. Perhaps it’s because they have inverted the food pyramid a couple of years back. Or perhaps it’s because they have low carb sections in the supermarkets.

7 million on statins in the UK

In the UK, a nation where 7 million people are prescribed statins, out of a population of 60 million, looking around me, all I saw were obese, and unhealthy-looking people. It is appalling. Have statins reduced the risk of heart attacks in the UK? There is no doubt that there are fewer deaths from heart attacks.

Survival rates are better. There are fewer transfats in the diet, and people are smoking less.

I believe that better education to encourage people to change your lifestyle would be a far more effective way of preventing heart attacks. Along with the acceptance by health professionals that cholesterol is not the cause, but an indicator, and that they accept the latest research, which shows the real reason.

Are illness and sickness really an act of God? Philosophically, I suppose the answer is yes. But I would like to believe that by taking responsibility for my health and trying to understand the physiology according to the latest research, that I could do something about it.

Join Club NoMed today – it’s free!

I am very proud not to be taking medications. I’m sure that if I went to my doctor, she would find something or another for which I should be taking medications. But my blood pressure is normal; my pulse is low, my BMI is 22.5, I am physically active, I sleep well, I think clearly, Beyond the age of 45, the best benchmark one can have is to feel as if you are 45. But my benchmark is also to be a member of Club No Med after the age of 45.

Diabetes Disaster

I have just watched the BBC documentary “Diabetes Disaster”. Please watch it? The link is above. What you will see is tragic and avoidable. This is such a great shame for the United Kingdom. Indeed, for the world.

Forget the threat of radical Islam, Russia, North Korea, Aids and Climate Change. This can, and so it seems most likely will, threaten your existence. Especially if nothing changes in the way we deal with T2D (type 2 diabetes)

1 in 10 of the residents of Birmingham, England,  have T2D. This is causing incredible strain on the NHS (National Health Service). The complications include cardiovascular problems, kidney problems (nephropathy), neuropathy, joint inflammation and blindness (retinopathy). Sores that do not heal may lead to amputations of feet and legs.

gangrene photo
This man had his leg amputated because of gangrene in his foot

I would say that the main causes are too many carbohydrates in the diet and lack of exercise. But then again, I am not a doctor. What do I know? More to the point, what do they know?

In the documentary, we hear that the blame for the situation is “the system not working”.

Hospitals in Birmingham and other parts of the UK are being flooded with T2D patients. This is ruining the country and incurring massive costs.

We learn that there are 3 times the number of T2D cases than all forms of cancer.

We see John, who has a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 41 (obese) who finds it hard to control his diet. He takes medication: Metformin, Victoza and insulin. Why insulin? Surely this makes his obesity worse?

Yet one surgeon says the problem is too much fat and too much sugar. Why too much fat?  Have they never heard of LCHF, Paleo or ketogenic diets? Dear surgeon and T2D sufferer: Understand this. Eating carbohydrates is as damaging as smoking. Sitting still is as damaging as smoking. Yet everybody acknowledges the dangers and risks of smoking.

40% of diabetics are on dialysis (according to the commentary), which means they have degrees of kidney failure. Their blood needs to be cleaned by a machine. We see a former sportsman who is on dialysis. It surprised him to learn that he had T2D. I do not understand that people prefer amputations, Bariatric surgery or dialysis. They could learn an alternative lifestyle. Structured movement, correct breathing and low-carb diet. It is not hard. It takes time and choosing to take responsibility for one’s health.

Before the Millenium, T2D among children was unheard of in the UK. Now there are ever-increasing numbers. Wow! Is it contagious? (My joke.)

We meet a boy of 15 with T2D. He says “It can happen to everyone and anyone”. Wrong! Carbohydrate “poisoning” can happen to anyone and everyone – and it obviously does.

A Doctor says (of a youth with T2D) “He is eating more calories than he is burning off in exercise”. I suggest he looks at what Prof. David Ludwig, Zoe Harcombe Ph.D , or  Kris Gunnar Ph.D has to say on the subject. He might learn something new.

The frightening part of adolescent T2D is that the complications are serious. More so than with older people. Children are suffering from fatty liver and sclerosis of the liver.

We learn that there are 4 million diabetes sufferers in the UK. The NHS will have to make choices. Who and what to treat. Or run out of money. The NHS spends £1 billion per annum on treating T2D. An amputation costs some £38,000 including aftercare.

We see a 57-year old woman with both feet amputated. She has complications, so one leg is to be amputated above the knee. She almost looks happy with the attention she receives from the doctor when he informs her of this. Strange.  Was I really born and brought up in this strange country? I can conclude that eating carbs makes people dumb. I do not need research for that. It is evidence-based.

Another woman has Bariatric surgery. The surgeon butchers her stomach. He wants to do many more such operations. He claims it is “cost-effective” as it avoids later complications. Evidence? He says the problem is lack of resources. He means money.

So, the cause is bad diets? Can these doctors be specific? No. One says that the disease is unrelenting. What disease? T2D or eating carbohydrates?

At the end, we see John on a diet. He eats a plate of porridge (carbs) and looks forward to an apple (carbs) later. No one has told him that the carbs are exacerbating his hunger. If he had an omelette, for example, he would not feel so hungry.

I was sad and also angry watching this. It is not a phenomena restricted to the UK. It is global. It is not only treatable without drugs and surgery, it is in most cases preventable. There is a waste of resources. The beneficiary is the medical industry. The losers are the victims and society.

But hey! I live in Denmark! We are better informed! Only the biggest company here makes drugs to treat T2D. I should not rock the boat. This country can continue to build its wealth on the misery of others.

About the author: Steve Pickering lives in Denmark, is English and born in 1953.  Health and fitness has always been an interest. He was startled by the positive results of adopting the Sakharoff Protocol. So he decided to help Misha Sakharoff produce and promote a video course to help people improve their health. Along with his work with Misha, he teaches English privately.