Thin at 60 – a new taboo?

I have had a great morning! I fasted since yesterday afternoon. I started the day with a glass of water with bicarbonate of soda. Followed that sometime later with a Bulletproof tea. That is tea with coconut oil, dairy cream and butter. Delicious!

I then went swimming. With bags of energy, 2,500 metres crawl was no problem. Then a sauna and a cold plunge. I came out of the swimming hall feeling energised and healthy.

I went to the local supermarket to buy lunch and met a friend, E., whom I had not seen for quite a while.

“Steve, you look so thin! Are you ill?”. I can tell you that I am used to this question. What she said next was new, though. “You know, you should not be so thin being over 60 – it badly affects your looks!”

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Here is a photo of me taken when I got home. What do you think?

OK, I thought. How would I look if I was in a wheelchair. Having had both my legs amputated, due to Type 2 Diabetes? I didn’t say this. I could have retorted, “You’ve gained a lot of weight, are you ill ?” Because that would be speaking the truth.

I tried to explain my lifestyle change.

“Oh, I want to enjoy the pleasures of life -I smoke, I drink, I do not eat ecological food – it’s rubbish! Besides, my BMI (Body Mass Index) is good”

Knowing that the BMI is not an accurate way of measuring obesity, I asked her a question.

“Have you heard of the waist/height ratio?”

“No – what is that?”

I explained that this was a far better method of indicating if you are overweight or underweight. She asked me for something to write on. I gave her one of my Sakharoff.com cards. “Now, tell me the formula?”

I said that you take the waist measurement above the navel. Divide this by the height. If the result is over .5, then it shows you are obese. I showed her using my measurements on the calculator on my smartphone. 82/179 (cm)  =.4581.  She was in no hurry to let me calculate hers!

We continued the conversation as we walked around the shop. She had a friend in Spain who has always been so thin and now, at 71, she was ill. I said that it was possible to be underweight as well. The art of it is to find a weight where you reach homeostasis – normality. Or in Nature’s eyes, perfection.

If you follow a ketogenic diet, your body will find its right weight. Automatically. Because your blood sugar  levels are stable. Your insulin is thus stable. That means that the insulin is not storing excess carbs as fat for a rainy day. It worked for me. According to everyone I meet, I seem to have the DNA from a different species. They are not built like that. It won’t work for them.

Bullshit!

We left each other at the checkout. E., thinking I was a health fanatic. Me, thinking that she was cheating herself of life. Well, you win some, you lose some.

Diabetes Disaster

I have just watched the BBC documentary “Diabetes Disaster”. Please watch it? The link is above. What you will see is tragic and avoidable. This is such a great shame for the United Kingdom. Indeed, for the world.

Forget the threat of radical Islam, Russia, North Korea, Aids and Climate Change. This can, and so it seems most likely will, threaten your existence. Especially if nothing changes in the way we deal with T2D (type 2 diabetes)

1 in 10 of the residents of Birmingham, England,  have T2D. This is causing incredible strain on the NHS (National Health Service). The complications include cardiovascular problems, kidney problems (nephropathy), neuropathy, joint inflammation and blindness (retinopathy). Sores that do not heal may lead to amputations of feet and legs.

gangrene photo
This man had his leg amputated because of gangrene in his foot

I would say that the main causes are too many carbohydrates in the diet and lack of exercise. But then again, I am not a doctor. What do I know? More to the point, what do they know?

In the documentary, we hear that the blame for the situation is “the system not working”.

Hospitals in Birmingham and other parts of the UK are being flooded with T2D patients. This is ruining the country and incurring massive costs.

We learn that there are 3 times the number of T2D cases than all forms of cancer.

We see John, who has a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 41 (obese) who finds it hard to control his diet. He takes medication: Metformin, Victoza and insulin. Why insulin? Surely this makes his obesity worse?

Yet one surgeon says the problem is too much fat and too much sugar. Why too much fat?  Have they never heard of LCHF, Paleo or ketogenic diets? Dear surgeon and T2D sufferer: Understand this. Eating carbohydrates is as damaging as smoking. Sitting still is as damaging as smoking. Yet everybody acknowledges the dangers and risks of smoking.

40% of diabetics are on dialysis (according to the commentary), which means they have degrees of kidney failure. Their blood needs to be cleaned by a machine. We see a former sportsman who is on dialysis. It surprised him to learn that he had T2D. I do not understand that people prefer amputations, Bariatric surgery or dialysis. They could learn an alternative lifestyle. Structured movement, correct breathing and low-carb diet. It is not hard. It takes time and choosing to take responsibility for one’s health.

Before the Millenium, T2D among children was unheard of in the UK. Now there are ever-increasing numbers. Wow! Is it contagious? (My joke.)

We meet a boy of 15 with T2D. He says “It can happen to everyone and anyone”. Wrong! Carbohydrate “poisoning” can happen to anyone and everyone – and it obviously does.

A Doctor says (of a youth with T2D) “He is eating more calories than he is burning off in exercise”. I suggest he looks at what Prof. David Ludwig, Zoe Harcombe Ph.D , or  Kris Gunnar Ph.D has to say on the subject. He might learn something new.

The frightening part of adolescent T2D is that the complications are serious. More so than with older people. Children are suffering from fatty liver and sclerosis of the liver.

We learn that there are 4 million diabetes sufferers in the UK. The NHS will have to make choices. Who and what to treat. Or run out of money. The NHS spends £1 billion per annum on treating T2D. An amputation costs some £38,000 including aftercare.

We see a 57-year old woman with both feet amputated. She has complications, so one leg is to be amputated above the knee. She almost looks happy with the attention she receives from the doctor when he informs her of this. Strange.  Was I really born and brought up in this strange country? I can conclude that eating carbs makes people dumb. I do not need research for that. It is evidence-based.

Another woman has Bariatric surgery. The surgeon butchers her stomach. He wants to do many more such operations. He claims it is “cost-effective” as it avoids later complications. Evidence? He says the problem is lack of resources. He means money.

So, the cause is bad diets? Can these doctors be specific? No. One says that the disease is unrelenting. What disease? T2D or eating carbohydrates?

At the end, we see John on a diet. He eats a plate of porridge (carbs) and looks forward to an apple (carbs) later. No one has told him that the carbs are exacerbating his hunger. If he had an omelette, for example, he would not feel so hungry.

I was sad and also angry watching this. It is not a phenomena restricted to the UK. It is global. It is not only treatable without drugs and surgery, it is in most cases preventable. There is a waste of resources. The beneficiary is the medical industry. The losers are the victims and society.

But hey! I live in Denmark! We are better informed! Only the biggest company here makes drugs to treat T2D. I should not rock the boat. This country can continue to build its wealth on the misery of others.

About the author: Steve Pickering lives in Denmark, is English and born in 1953.  Health and fitness has always been an interest. He was startled by the positive results of adopting the Sakharoff Protocol. So he decided to help Misha Sakharoff produce and promote a video course to help people improve their health. Along with his work with Misha, he teaches English privately.

 

Take this drug and live to 120!

metformin

Read all about it! Take this drug and live to 120!

Metformin is being touted  as a candidate for keeping people alive until they are 120! (sourceDaily Telegraph)

Should we clap our hands with excitement? NO!

The very notion of using a drug to stay alive should set off alarm bells with every person.  Metformin is a generic drug, which means that no one in particular owns the rights to produce it. At the present time, it is cheap. If a drugs giant wanted to, they could corner the market and increase the price. This is every drug company’s boss dream come true!

What is metformin (sometimes misnamed Metmorphine) currently prescribed for? It regulates blood glucose levels in diabetes patients. This is without the side effect of straight insulin, which is an increase in body weight.

In the context of longevity, what is Metformin supposed to do? According to the article:

“Metformin increases the number of oxygen molecules released into a cell, which appears to boost robustness and longevity.”

Do we need a drug to do that? Have they not heard that a practice known as Buteyko Breathing does exactly that? I am doing Buteyko breathing as a part of the Sakharoff Path of Strong Health course. So, according to this research, I am also going to live until I am 120 – without drugs!

Why are we so keen to take drugs for every condition? Drugs are typically synthetic biochemical substances. They are prescribed to suppress the symptoms of physiological conditions. Not necessarily to cure the condition. The efficacy is based on evidence. The evidence does not show  if it affects other body systems. Especially if drug companies fund the research.

57  years more of taking a drug without side effects; are you kidding me?

According to Drugs.com, the main side effects of metformin are:

” Commonly reported side effects of metformin include: lactic acidosis, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, nausea and vomiting, and flatulence. Other side effects include: diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, decreased vitamin b12 serum concentrate, and weakness.”

Now the rest:

  • Abdominal or stomach discomfort
  • cough or hoarseness
  • decreased appetite
  • diarrhea
  • fast or shallow breathing
  • fever or chills
  • general feeling of discomfort
  • lower back or side pain
  • muscle pain or cramping
  • painful or difficult urination
  • sleepiness

Less common:

  • Anxiety
  • blurred vision
  • chest discomfort
  • cold sweats
  • coma
  • confusion
  • cool, pale skin
  • depression
  • difficult or labored breathing
  • dizziness
  • fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse
  • feeling of warmth
  • headache
  • increased hunger
  • increased sweating
  • nausea
  • nervousness
  • nightmares
  • redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest
  • seizures
  • shakiness
  • shortness of breath
  • slurred speech
  • tightness in the chest
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • wheezing

Rare

  • Behavior change similar to being drunk
  • difficulty with concentrating
  • drowsiness
  • lack or loss of strength
  • restless sleep
  • unusual sleepiness

Minor Side Effects

Some of the side effects that can occur with metformin may not need medical attention. As your body adjusts to the medicine during treatment these side effects may go away. Your health care professional may also be able to tell you about ways to reduce or prevent some of these side effects. If any of the following side effects continue, are bothersome or if you have any questions about them, check with your health care professional:

More common:

  • Acid or sour stomach
  • belching
  • bloated
  • excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines
  • full feeling
  • heartburn
  • indigestion
  • loss of appetite
  • metallic taste in the mouth
  • passing of gas
  • stomachache
  • stomach upset or pain
  • vomiting
  • weight loss

Less common:

  • Abnormal stools
  • bad, unusual, or unpleasant (after) taste
  • change in taste
  • difficulty with moving
  • discoloration of the fingernails or toenails
  • flu-like symptoms
  • joint pain
  • rash
  • runny nose
  • sneezing
  • stuffy nose
  • swollen joints

To the best of my knowledge, Buteyko breathing has NONE of the side effects. But it does the same thing as “scientists” claim Metformin does.

In short, Buteyko Breathing encourages retention of carbon dioxide in the lungs and blood. This facilitates the release of oxygen from haemeglobin to the cells. This, oxygenating cells. The Bohr Effect. Look it up.

I, for one, prefer a physical method of attaining longevity over taking drugs. Any drugs. What about you?